Canning Journal

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I’m so excited to have this done!  I couldn’t find what I wanted online allready so I made my own and wanted to share with you all too.
In my great grandmother’s journal she would record all of her canning and I remember as a kid finding this amazing to read.  (Since they were farmers the numbers were pretty big of course!)  As a newlywed I wanted to carry this on so I tried to keep track, with mixed results every year.  So I’ve finally made a binder to keep it in with my favorite recipes in sheet protectors as well.  I know I’ll remember since it’s all together and handy.  I love looking back and seeing what I’ve accomplished all recorded.  It’s also helpful when trying to remember which recipe I used when I made something we just loved.
I made a few options for the cover page since I thought all the images were so perfect and couldn’t decide and both artist’s agreed to let me use their artwork.
And plenty of links for other helpful things to add in as well!
I’m making a few for gifts for canning friends and found the cute mason jar cookie cutters at Cost Plus World Market to tie on as well.    Hope this comes in handy for you all as well!

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A few options for the cover page:
From Art by Amanda Hillburn:
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Watercolor jar canning journal cover (Thanks Amanda!)

Or this one using images from Aimee at Twigg Studios:
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Hand painted canning journal cover   (Thanks Aimee!)

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canning journal

Or if you’d rather the title was food preservation journal.

And some other handy things to have in the binder:

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This Ball Produce Purchase Guide is so handy to have in sheet protectors and easy to find instead of sifting through my canning books.

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Dating a Ball Jar, Logo history  just for fun.  I have some of my Grandmother’s old jars and I have been shocked to realize how old some of them are!  Even more amazing is how good of condition they are in and to think how many times they’ve been used!

And of course print off some of these cute labels and have on hand in a pocket:

Adorable “Canned with Love” labels

Super fun labels that you can make into shrinky dinks!

And if that’s not enough, here’s a link to a ton more labels and tags

Home Canned Spaghetti Sauce and Salsa

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I’m in a canning frenzy here.  I had loads of misc tomatoes, cherry, sungolds, romas, all kinds from the garden.  I haven’t canned salsa or spaghetti sauce before and when a friend shared the recipe she uses I knew I had to try it.  She is a master food preserver and when she says it’s a tested safe recipe I know that doesn’t mean she waited 10 minutes after feeding her husband before serving it.  (like my Grandma did!) I did alter the amounts of peppers and some seasonings after clearing that it would be safe.  If you want it hotter, you can adjust up to the maximum listed.  I’m totally hooked and will be canning loads more next week!  The salsa is a mild on the heat with my adjustment with the peppers, but a little smoky and perfect.  The spaghetti sauce is a little smoky as well with the addition of paprika.  You can add that last and see if you like it better.  I don’t know if I liked it better with or without.  Both are so good!  I look forward to opening up jars of summer this winter!
Once again, I won’t get into canning basics, but if you aren’t up to date on current safety techniques, please review at the National Center for Home Food Preservation.  And of course you could freeze this if you don’t can.

Salsa
Makes about 6 pints

8 cups tomatoes
2 1/2 cups finely chopped onion
1/2 cup finely chopped bell pepper (I like yellow, orange, or red) (MAXIMUM 1 1/2 cups)
1 jalapeno, finely chopped (MAXIMUM 5)
6 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp cumin
2 tsp black pepper
2 T dried cilantro
2 T dried oregano
2 T canning salt
1/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup bottled lime juice (You can’t use fresh in canning, it doesn’t have the required acidity level to be safe)
1/2 cup cider vinegar
16 oz tomato sauce
16 oz tomato paste

To prepare the tomatoes you can use your preference for peeling.  I spread my tomatoes in a single layer on baking sheets and roasted at 350 degrees for 15 minutes for cherry tomatoes, 25 to 30 minutes for romas.  Let cool slightly then run through a food mill.
Combine all ingredients in a pot and whisk to combine well.  Whisk frequently and bring to a boil over medium high heat.  Let boil for 10 minutes, stirring frequently.
Fill pint jars with 1/2 inch headspace and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.

Spaghetti Sauce
Makes about 6 pints

8 cups tomatoes
2 cups finely chopped onion
1/2 cup finely chopped bell pepper (I like yellow, orange, or red) (MAXIMUM 1 1/2 cups)
6 cloves garlic, minced
2 T canning salt
2 T dried basil
2 T dried oregano
1 T fennel seeds
2 tsp black pepper
1-2 tsp smoked paprika (optional)
1/3 cup sugar
1 cup cider vinegar
16 oz tomato sauce
16 oz tomato paste

To prepare the tomatoes you can use your preference for peeling.  I spread my tomatoes in a single layer on baking sheets and roasted at 350 degrees for 15 minutes for cherry tomatoes, 25 to 30 minutes for romas.  Let cool slightly then run through a food mill.
Combine all ingredients in a pot and whisk to combine well.  Whisk frequently and bring to a boil over medium high heat.  Let boil for 10 minutes, stirring frequently.
Fill pint jars with 1/2 inch headspace and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.

Home Canned Spaghetti Sauce and Salsa

Home Canned Spaghetti Sauce and Salsa

Ingredients

    Salsa:
  • 8 cups tomatoes
  • 2 1/2 cups finely chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped bell pepper (I like yellow, orange, or red) (MAXIMUM 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 jalapeno, finely chopped (MAXIMUM 5)
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 2 T dried cilantro
  • 2 T dried oregano
  • 2 T canning salt
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup bottled lime juice (You can’t use fresh in canning, it doesn’t have the required acidity level to be safe)
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 16 oz tomato sauce
  • 16 oz tomato paste
    For Spaghetti Sauce:
  • 8 cups tomatoes
  • 2 cups finely chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped bell pepper (I like yellow, orange, or red) (MAXIMUM 1 1/2 cups)
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 T canning salt
  • 2 T dried basil
  • 2 T dried oregano
  • 1 T fennel seeds
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1-2 tsp smoked paprika (optional)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 16 oz tomato sauce
  • 16 oz tomato paste

Instructions

  • To prepare the tomatoes you can use your preference for peeling. I spread my tomatoes in a single layer on baking sheets and roasted at 350 degrees for 15 minutes for cherry tomatoes, 25 to 30 minutes for romas. Let cool slightly then run through a food mill.
  • Combine all ingredients in a pot and whisk to combine well. Whisk frequently and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Let boil for 10 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Fill pint jars with 1/2 inch headspace and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.
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    Lime Jelly

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    I worked on a historical farm when I was a teenager, in the Tea Room.  It remains my favorite job.  The old house was turned into a museum of sorts, and the barn next to it became a gift shop and upstairs there was a tea room.  There is probably nothing that speaks to my soul more than the whistle of a tea kettle.  I could go on about that, but I’ll leave it for another day.

    In the tea house they sold Rose’s Lime Marmalade.  I had never heard of such a thing, but I guess if you’re English you would.  It is divine and fills my never ending craving for citrus flavor.  I’ve tried for years to make my own version at home but no luck.  But today? Today my friends, I finally did it.  The right balance of acid and pectin and perfection.  When it started to gel in the pot my heart skipped a beat.  It tastes like summer in a tea house, with a tea kettle whistling… an open window overlooking a farm…  A new favorite I know I will be making for many years to come.  If you don’t want to can this, you could certainly freeze in containers as freezer jam.
    I won’t get into canning basics, but if you aren’t up to date on current safety techniques, please review at the National Center for Home Food Preservation.
    I used my favorite pectin here, Pomona’s Universal Pectin (which has the calcium powder to make the calcium water in the recipe and also the pectin in each box.).  I really like this pectin because you can use lower sugar or even honey, make up to a quadruple batch (normally you can only do one batch of jam at a time with other pectins) and is my personal favorite.
    Now go make some, and spread it on a crumpet, scone, or even some toast… and close your eyes and think of tea kettles. 🙂
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    LIME JELLY
    Makes 5 half pints (and a little extra)

    2 cups lime juice
    2 cups water
    3 tsp calcium water
    3 cups sugar
    4 tsp Pomona’s pectin powder
    zest of 4 limes (I wanted a little bigger fleck of zest so I left the microplane in the drawer and used my old-school zester.)

    Put the lime juice, water, and calcium water in a pot.
    Combine the sugar and pectin powder in a bowl and mix to combine.  Set aside.
    Bring the juice mixture in the pot to a boil over medium to medium high heat.
    Add the sugar mixture and stir for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin and sugar.
    When it comes back to a boil remove from the heat and stir in zest.
    Fill half pint jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace.
    Wipe rims, top with lids and rings.   Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

    Lime Jelly

    Yield: 5 half pints

    Lime Jelly

    Ingredients

    • 2 cups lime juice
    • 2 cups water
    • 3 tsp calcium water
    • 3 cups sugar
    • 4 tsp Pomona’s pectin powder
    • zest of 4 limes

    Instructions

  • Put the lime juice, water, and calcium water in a pot.
  • Combine the sugar and pectin powder in a bowl and mix to combine. Set aside.
  • Bring the juice mixture in the pot to a boil over medium to medium high heat.
  • Add the sugar mixture and stir for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin and sugar.
  • When it comes back to a boil remove from the heat and stir in zest.
  • Fill half pint jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace.
  • Wipe rims, top with lids and rings. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.
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    Canning: Zucchini Pineapple

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    I was a little skeptic when I saw this recipe.  But what is cheaper than zucchini?  Especially giant zucchini that everyone is trying to get rid of this time of year? So I gave it a go.  And I am shocked at how much we like it!  I thought the zucchini would become mush and fall apart.  But it keeps it shape in the liquid and since it is simmered in the pineapple juice it takes on that flavor completely.  I’m so glad I tried it, I think this is a new favorite canning recipe!
    For general canning instructions and basics, go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, I’ll leave that up to them so I don’t have to repeat it. 🙂

    ZUCCHINI PINEAPPLE
    1 batch used about 3 jumbo zucchini (this will depend how seedy your are) and made about 8 pints

    4 quarts cubed or shredded zucchini
    46 oz can unsweetened pineapple juice
    1 1/2 cups bottled lemon juice
    3 cups sugar

    I like to cut the ends of the zucchini and cut into pieces to work with before peeling it.
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    Peel the zucchini and cut off the sides,  discarding the middle with the seeds.
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    Cut zucchini in small chunks, similar to pineapple tidbits shape and size.
    Place zucchini with juices and sugar in a large pot and bring to a boil.
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    Simmer for 20 minutes.
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    Fill half pint or pint jars with zucchini and liquid (I like to use a slotted spoon to fill with zucchini, then top off with the liquid.)  leaving 1/2 inch headspace.
    Process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.

    Recipe source: So Easy To Preserve, The National Center for Home Food Preservation.

    Canning: Zucchini Pineapple

    Yield: 8 pints

    Ingredients

    • 4 quarts cubed or shredded zucchini
    • 46 oz can unsweetened pineapple juice
    • 1 1/2 cups bottled lemon juice
    • 3 cups sugar
    • Cut zucchini in small chunks, similar to pineapple tidbits shape and size.
    • Place zucchini with juices and sugar in a large pot and bring to a boil.
    • Simmer for 20 minutes.
    • Fill half pint or pint jars with zucchini and liquid (I like to use a slotted spoon to fill with zucchini, then top off with the liquid.) leaving 1/2 inch headspace.
    • Process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.

    Instructions

  • I like to cut the ends of the zucchini and cut into pieces to work with before peeling it.
  • Peel the zucchini and cut off the sides, discarding the middle with the seeds.
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    Is Canning Safe?

    Okay, so I want to start out by saying I am NOT the “canning patrol”.  I will not be coming to your home and going through your home canned goods and deciding what is safe and not safe and throwing things out.  I am merely giving my opinion. I just wanted to get that out in the open first.
    It seems I’ve been fielding a lot of canning questions and concerns lately from friends and thought I should share some thoughts here.

    First off, yes, I do can.
    Second, I am a stickler for rules when it comes to canning safety.
    Third, you should be too.  (all though, as long as you don’t ask me to eat what you canned, that’s really your business).

    I have heard sooo many times the declaration “I’ve done it this way for years, and I’ve never gotten sick from it!  So it must be safe!”
    Let me explain why I think that’s a foolish thought.
    My grandmother, as most country women of her time, canned pretty much anything and everything.  My mom recalls many an evening before dinner when her mom would open a jar of home canned food, scoop off the top layer of  “stuff” and then take a spoon of the contents and hand it to my grandfather saying “Here Johnny, try this.  See if it’s still good.”   If he was still alive by dinnertime, everyone had to eat it.
    Did he survive? Yes. Does it sound like a good idea though? (Please tell me you’re saying no!)
    None of us knows when we are going to be lucky or unlucky when it comes to eating something questionable.   And when it comes to your and your families health, isn’t taking a few extra precautions worth it?
    Just because someone doesn’t get “sick”, doesn’t mean it’s healthy.  And we certainly don’t know when we’re going to be “unlucky”, or if we are causing harm to our body even though we haven’t gotten “sick”.

    So how can we know we are canning safely?  I don’t think you know what to avoid doing unless you know what there is to be afraid of.
    How can you do that?  Well, many extension offices have classes you can take (locally you take one through WSU Extension office from a Master Food Preserver).  You can research all the information and directions available from the National Center for Home Food Preservation.  And their book, So Easy to Preserve, is invaluable with more recipes than you’ll ever need.
    Use SAFE equipment.  And just because it is sold in stores does NOT make it safe.  For instance, steam canners are still sold.  Are steam canners safe?
    I certainly don’t think so.  Not just because they have been scientifically proven INEFFECTIVE at killing bacteria, but because common sense tells me it’s a bad idea.  Let me present you with 2 scenarios.

    Scenario #1:
    Bring a shallow pot of water to a boil.  Now hold your hand in the steam for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Scenario #2:
    Bring a very large pot of boiling water to boil.  Now COMPLETELY submerge your hand in water and keep it there for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Which Scenario would you pick?  Probably #1, right? Why? Because as hot as the steam might get, it certainly wouldn’t be as painful as #2.   While steam may be hot, it will never penetrate the jars, heating through to the middle of the contents to kill harmful bacteria.  It just isn’t possible.

    So when it comes to canning, use a little common sense.  Just because you warm the glue compound on the canning lid enough to seal does NOT make it properly processed.  And just like anytime you cook, if you don’t take proper precautions, you can get people sick.  You can even kill someone.

    You’re probably wondering if I still can?  Yes.  Absolutely.  Since I have young children I choose not to can meats and such that take more time.  But I am glad that I know how to do it.  And when I do can,  I am careful, and remember to follow safe CURRENT guidelines.   I hope you will too.

    Refrigerator Pickles

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I have a weakness for pickles.  The really tart, crisp ones.  Costco used to sell one I loved but they don’t carry them anymore.  So I decided to take matters into my own hands. 🙂
    I have made them without the fresh dill if I couldn’t find any, but I prefer it with the dill if possible.  If you like spicier pickles, you could throw in a dried chili or two.  I usually make 3 or 4 quarts at a time, adjusting the recipe accordingly.
    These do keep really well for a few months and are best after at least a couple days of sitting.

    REFRIGERATOR PICKLES
    Makes 1 quart

    2 cups water
    1 cup white vinegar
    1 T salt
    4 cloves garlic
    2 tsp pickling spice
    couple sprigs fresh dill
    pickling cucumbers, number depends on size, usually about 3 or 4

    Place the fresh dill in a quart size canning jar (wide mouth is easier to work with here).  Cut cucumbers into quarters and pack into jar.
    Add garlic and pickling spice to jar as well.
    Bring water, vinegar, and salt to a boil in a small pot.  Pour into jar, covering everything.  Let cool before covering with a lid.  Store in the fridge for up to 3 months.

    Refrigerator Pickles

    Yield: 1 quart

    Ingredients

    • 2 cups water
    • 1 cup white vinegar
    • 1 T salt
    • 4 cloves garlic
    • 2 tsp pickling spice
    • couple sprigs fresh dill
    • pickling cucumbers, number depends on size, usually about 3 or 4

    Instructions

  • Place the fresh dill in a quart size canning jar (wide mouth is easier to work with here). Cut cucumbers into quarters and pack into jar.
  • Add garlic and pickling spice to jar as well.
  • Bring water, vinegar, and salt to a boil in a small pot. Pour into jar, covering everything. Let cool before covering with a lid. Store in the fridge for up to 3 months.
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    Zesty Peach BBQ Sauce (Canned)

    This is a canning recipe I use all the time.  I am so upset with myself if peach season passes and I don’t get around to making any!
    This sauce is very versatile, I use it on grilled chicken, toss meatballs in it, you name it.
    This sauce is a tangy BBQ sauce, and if you want it sweeter you can add brown sugar before using, or one of my favorite ways, which is to add some tomato based BBQ sauce to it.
    I won’t be a broken record about canning safety, but please head to National Home for Food Preservation to brush up and make sure you are doing it correctly.  If you follow some super simple guidelines, canning is very safe and lots of fun.
    And you have all the pretty little jars at the end to admire. 🙂
    You could also just freeze this in freezer containers if you’d rather, as well.

    ZESTY PEACH BBQ SAUCE
    Makes about 8 half pint jars

    6 cups pitted, peeled, and finely chopped peaches*
    1 cup finely chopped seeded red bell pepper
    1 cup finely chopped onion
    3 T minced garlic
    1 1/4 cups honey
    3/4 cup cider vinegar
    1 T Worcestershire
    2 tsp dry mustard
    2 tsp kosher salt

    Put all ingredients in a large pot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat.
    Reduce heat and boil gently for 25 minutes, stirring often.  Consistency should be like a thin bbq sauce.
    Ladle into 8 oz (half pint) jars leaving 1/2″ head space.
    Process for 15 minutes in a boiling water bath canner.

    (If you want a spicier sauce, add 2 tsp hot pepper flakes to sauce at beginning, we found it was too spicy with these so I left them out).

    To serve: If you want a sweeter sauce, add 1/4 cup brown sugar to a jar, or equal parts tomato based bbq sauce when ready to use.

    *To peel peaches: drop in a pot of boiling water, leave for 30-60 seconds.
    Rinse under cold running water and peels should come off easily.  If your peaches are a little green this won’t work so well.  Just use a paring knife o cut the peels off.
    Recipe slightly adapted for The Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving 

    Zesty Peach BBQ Sauce (Canned)

    Yield: 8 half pints

    Ingredients

    • 6 cups pitted, peeled, and finely chopped peaches*
    • 1 cup finely chopped seeded red bell pepper
    • 1 cup finely chopped onion
    • 3 T minced garlic
    • 1 1/4 cups honey
    • 3/4 cup cider vinegar
    • 1 T Worcestershire
    • 2 tsp dry mustard
    • 2 tsp kosher salt

    Instructions

  • Put all ingredients in a large pot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat.
  • Reduce heat and boil gently for 25 minutes, stirring often. Consistency should be like a thin bbq sauce.
  • Ladle into 8 oz (half pint) jars leaving 1/2" head space.
  • Process for 15 minutes in a boiling water bath canner.
  • (If you want a spicier sauce, add 2 tsp hot pepper flakes to sauce at beginning, we found it was too spicy with these so I left them out).
  • To serve: If you want a sweeter sauce, add 1/4 cup brown sugar to a jar, or equal parts tomato based bbq sauce when ready to use.
  • *To peel peaches: drop in a pot of boiling water, leave for 30-60 seconds.
  • Rinse under cold running water and peels should come off easily. If your peaches are a little green this won't work so well. Just use a paring knife o cut the peels off.
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    Raspberry Pepper Jelly


     

    We still have a good amount of raspberries on our patch, so I’m thinking I need to make another batch of this.  I didn’t get around to posting i before the end of raspberry season last year, and luckily I remembered this year. 🙂  I am lucky enough to have a steam juicer (because I found one for FIFTEEN dollars on Craigslist.  Talk about a bargain.)
    It makes jellies SO much easier, not to mention the juices I throw in the freezer for making syrups or flavoring lemonade.  If you don’t have a steam juicer, you can look here for directions on extracting the raspberry juice using a jelly bag.  I won’t go into all the technicalities of canning, except to say that it really is not like regular cooking.   Just like anytime you cook, if you are careless, unsanitary, and don’t follow food safety rules, you can make someone sick.  And that’s not good eats.
    But, if you are clean and follow proven guidelines then you really don’t need to worry.  There is a great resource, the National Center for Home Food Preservation, that offers great education on the matter.
    Moving on, this jelly is my favorite to make.  While it may not work for PB and Jelly sandwiches, it is great on crackers, or especially as my friend Janine suggested, with a little cream cheese on the crackers as well.
    And while we don’t love hot peppers and spicy food, this is spicy without being overwhelming, especially when paired with cream cheese.

    RASPBERRY PEPPER JELLY

    1 3/4 cups white vinegar, divided
    1 red bell pepper, seeds and stem removed, optional *
    5 red chili peppers (also called fresno peppers or red jalapenos), stem removed, seeds left or removed for more mild heat
    raspberry juice, about 1 1/2 cups, give or take
    6 1/2 cups sugar
    6 oz Certo liquid pectin

    Put the peppers and 1/2 cup of the vinegar in a blender and process until smooth.


    Add enough raspberry juice to bring the total liquid to 2 1/2 cups.
    *If you want a more mild jelly, I would leave out the bell pepper so you’ll be using more raspberry juice.
    In a large pot combine the remaining 1 1/4 cups vinegar and the sugar.
    Bring o a boil over medium high heat until sugar is dissolved, stirring occasionally.
    Add pepper mixture while stirring and bring o a low boil.  Let boil for 5 minutes while stirring.
    Remove from heat and add the pectin.
    Pour into jelly (1/2 pint) jars and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.
    Recipe source: My friend Janine

    Pickled Vegetables

    What is it about the tart taste of pickled foods that I love so much?  It seems the older I get the more I like them!   I made this recipe for our German dinner party we had last month, wanting a nice light appetizer that would also use the amazing vegetables I found at the market.  And while this makes a pretty large batch, I think it would be something fun to give for gifts in little jars or containers and while I’m not sure exactly how long it will keep in the fridge, it should last a pretty long time with all that vinegar.
    The vegetables stayed nice and crunchy, and I love the color they got from the red cauliflower.
    You could use any combination of vegetables you want as well.  I’ll be putting a big jar out of this at Thanksgiving with some other munchies.
    PICKLED VEGETABLES

    3 lbs assorted vegetables
    I used:
    4 carrots
    1 orange cauliflower
    1 purple cauliflower
    1 green bell pepper
    2 green zucchini
    2 yellow zucchini
    Pickling liquid:
    8 cups apple cider vinegar
    2 1/2 cups sugar
    1/3 cup mustard seeds
    1/3 cup celery seed
    6 garlic cloves
     generous handfull fresh dill
    5 T pickling salt
    Cut vegetables into small pieces. Some people like them cut smaller, some larger.  Whichever is fine.
    Put in jars and set aside.
    Place the vinegar, sugar, mustard seeds, and celery seeds in a pot and bring to a boil.  Simmer for a couple minutes or until sugar is dissolved.  Crush garlic and add along with dill and pickling salt.  (If using kosher salt add to liquid before boiling.)
    Pour hot liquid over vegetables in jars and put in the refrigerator to cool before adding a lid.
    Store in the refrigerator.
    NOTE: This is NOT a recipe designed for canning- If you want to can pickled vegetables make sure you use a verified recipe.
    Recipe by My Stained Apron
    Pickled Vegetables

    Ingredients

      3 lbs assorted vegetables of choosing. I used:
    • 4 carrots
    • 1 orange cauliflower
    • 1 purple cauliflower
    • 1 green bell pepper
    • 2 green zucchini
    • 2 yellow zucchini
      Pickling liquid:
    • 8 cups apple cider vinegar
    • 2 1/2 cups sugar
    • 1/3 cup mustard seeds
    • 1/3 cup celery seed
    • 6 garlic cloves
    • generous handful fresh dill
    • 5 T pickling salt

    Instructions

  • Cut vegetables into small pieces. Some people like them cut smaller, some larger. Whichever is fine.
  • Put in jars and set aside.
  • Place the vinegar, sugar, mustard seeds, and celery seeds in a pot and bring to a boil. Simmer for a couple minutes or until sugar is dissolved. Crush garlic and add along with dill and pickling salt. (If using kosher salt add to liquid before boiling.)
  • Pour hot liquid over vegetables in jars and put in the refrigerator to cool before adding a lid.
  • Store in the refrigerator.
  • NOTE: This is NOT a recipe designed for canning- If you want to can pickled vegetables make sure you use a verified recipe.
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    Cinnamon Apples

    I love the sight of jars lined up on the counter.  A syrup simmering on the stove.
    The smell of cinnamon and apples filling the house.  It reminds me of my childhood, makes me think about my grandmothers, and excites me to pass on the skill to my girls.
    This is another recipe I’ve had sitting around to share since last fall.  It’s one I’ve made many times, and I recall it being the first canning recipe I made as a newleywed.  We didn’t have much money, but I got a great deal on apples and pears from Mt. Hood (the best place to get apples and pears!), and so I opened up my grandmother’s canning book that had been passed on to me and gave these a try.  They were a success, along with some mint pears too.  I remember my Dad talking about them and how much he loved them.  They were a staple in their root cellar and I’m so glad I was able to keep the recipe alive. 
    If you want to make it easy on yourself, make sure to splurge and get yourself one of these, but just trust me, get one with a clamp and not the suction base.  I originally had one with a suction base but it broke rather quickly (the suction base was never great), and after suffering through a year without one I decided on a model with the clamp base and LOVE it! 
    If you’re new to canning, or need a refresher, go here to the National Center Home Food Preservation for the safest info on canning.
    CINNAMON APPLES
    Makes 6 pints
    2 1/2 cups sugar
    5 cups water
    6 cinnamon sticks
    2 T whole allspice
    2 T whole cloves
    red food coloring, if desired or a few red hots
    6 lbs apples, cored, peeled, sliced, and soaked in water with “fruit fresh”
    Ready your boiling water bath.
    In a large pot, combine everything but apples.
    Bring syrup to a boil, then add apples.
    Cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
    Pack apples in pint jars (wide mouth come in handy here).
    Pour syrup over to cover, leaving 1/4 inch headspace (straining out the spices).
    Wipe jar rims and threads.
    Cover with 2 piece lids and screw bands finger tight.
    Process in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes.
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